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The small Indian State that’s driving a green revolution

The tiny state of Sikkim nestled in the Himalayas in northeastern India has been leading a green revolution of its own kind. Despite being small and isolated, and with its people leading their lives in extremely tough mountainous terrain, Sikkim has emerged as one of India’s environmental leaders.

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Fatal attraction: Turtles and plastic

The Galapagos green turtle’s favorite food is jellyfish, so wherever jellyfish are most abundant, turtles are bound to be close by. Unfortunately, plastic bags look like jellyfish when floating in the ocean, and if a turtle ingests a plastic bag, it forms a fatal blockage in the gut; usually resulting in death. This warning comes from the Galapagos Conservation Trust based in the United Kingdom and supporting turtle conservation projects since 1995.

Galapagos green turtles are endangered. They differ from other marine turtles by their serrated lower jaw and a single pair of scales covering their eyes. They can reach a length of 84cm and are known to weigh up to 136kg. They are fast swimmers, travelling at speeds up to 35mph over long distances thanks to their powerful flippers. They are even able to sleep underwater, but only for a few hours at a time.

The Trust is launching a new multi-year program to reduce plastic use in the Archipelago, where a ban on single-use plastic straws, bottles and bags will enter into force on 21 August 2018. The ban was promoted by the Governing Council of the Special Regime of the Galápagos.

Plastic debris ingested by turtles can cause intestinal blockage resulting in malnutrition, reduced growth rates and even death. Perhaps most distressingly, turtles can starve to death because they feel full after swallowing plastic debris.

A 2015 study, led by Qamar Schuyler of the University of Queensland and published in Global Change Biology, estimated that 52 percent of sea turtles worldwide have eaten plastic debris.

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This Indian birdwatching paradise is ditching plastic.

Nestled in the Himalayan foothills of northern India, the small hamlet of Pangot – with its dense forests, crisp mountain air, and 200 resident bird species – lures birdwatchers and nature enthusiasts from around the globe.  

This heavy flow of tourists has attracted a small army of vendors selling products such as plastic bottles of water, plastic bags of cookies and chips, and plastic-wrapped bars of soap. And until a few months back, there was nowhere in Pangot to properly dispose of this plastic waste. Instead, most people threw their waste into the bottom of a local gorge, from where it would eventually be washed down into the local river.

One day last year, Mohit Aggarwal, the owner of Jungle Lore Birding Lodge, decided it was time for a change. He began working with Chintan, an Indian non-profit group that specializes in waste, to devise a strategy to counter the plastic menace. They met other resort owners in the region to develop a plan.

Their aim was to make this natural paradise completely plastic free.

“It makes my heart bleed to visit the mountains and see litter everywhere, so I said we have to do something to reverse this trend,” Aggarwal says. “We have started with Pangot this year, but I want to replicate this model in all the properties we have across the hills.”

With a group of hotel owners, concerned citizens, school children and Chintan, all waste in Pangot is now being identified, segregated and managed – and efforts are underway to make Pangot waste-free.

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Picking up litter: Pointless exercise or powerful tool in the battle to beat plastic pollution?

Armed with bags, gloves, litter pickers and a strong sense of purpose, around 12,000 men, women and children got to work cleaning Britain’s streets, green spaces and beaches as part of a nationwide Great Plastic Pick Up during a weekend in early May.

The volunteers included young scouts, book club members, martial arts enthusiasts, politicians and celebrities - all giving their time to clear rubbish and raise awareness as part of the three-day campaign organized by the Daily Mail newspaper and environmental charity Keep Britain Tidy.

Prime Minister Theresa May, whose government has pledged to eliminate all avoidable plastic waste by 2042, took part at a school in Maidenhead and praised the volunteers for creating a “better environment for us all to share.”

Please see full article here          

 

Empowering waster workers for a cleaner, safer city

In the city of Pune in western India, a group of marginalized women are at the forefront of a campaign to clean their city.

Pune is home to India’s first wholly self-owned cooperative of self-employed waste pickers – what could be called Pune city’s all-women cleaning army. Through an agreement with the Pune Municipal Corporation (PMC), more than 3,000 women workers provide door-to-door waste collection services to over 600,000 homes in the city, recycling more than 50,000 tons of waste a year.

The workers segregate the waste that they collect into either recyclables— paper, plastics, metals, and glass—or wet waste, which is taken for composting. Known as “SWaCH” (Solid Waste Collection and Handling), the co-operative has developed a significant composting operation, which sees wet waste turned into valuable natural fertilizer. 

Please see full article here          

 

One year after the launch of #CleanSeas, the tide is turning

Do you feel uneasy when you buy a coffee in a takeaway plastic cup? Perhaps you feel awkward buying that bottle of water?

We hope so, because raising awareness of what plastic waste is doing to our oceans, our wildlife and ourselves is what UN Environment’s #CleanSeas campaign has been all about since its launch in February 2017.

We’ve given ourselves five years to build a global movement to tackle the excessive use of single-use plastics and get rid of dangerous microplastics in our toiletries and cosmetics. 

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Afroz Shah delivers urgent warning during the Sixth International Marine Debris Conference (San Diego, March 2018)

Our oceans are doomed unless governments around the world step up their efforts to tackle marine plastic pollution. This was the clear message from UN Environment Champion of the Earth Afroz Shah, who delivered the keynote speech at the Sixth International Marine Debris Conference in San Diego last month.

Among the speakers, was also Melati Wisjen. Together with her sister Isabel, the sixteen-year-old founded “Bye, Bye Plastic Bags”, an organization working to ban plastic bags in Bali, Indonesia. In her speech, Wisjen told the story of how her initiative came to be, and emphasized the role of youth in fighting marine litter. “We may be only 20 per cent of the world’s population”, she told the audience. “But we are 100 per cent of the future”.

The conference, which was co-organized by UN Environment and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, took place in San Diego, California, on 12-16 March, and brought together more than 700 experts, activists and government representatives to share experiences, learn from best practices and discuss the way forward for the fight against marine litter. The programme included more than 60 technical sessions organized in ten different tracks.

In addition, the conference also saw the winners of the CleanSeas photo competition and the Marine Litter Innovation Challenge being awarded their well-deserved prizes.

Click here for more information about the conference.

 

CleanSeas and Kenya’s Flipflopi join forces to tackle marine litter

Nairobi, 26 March, 2018  UN Environment’s campaign to reduce plastic pollution in the world’s oceans is teaming up with a Kenyan group, the Flipflopi Project, to build a traditional dhow sailing vessel made only from plastic waste collected from the country’s beaches.

The plan, named the Flipflopi expedition, is to sail the boat from Kenya to Cape Town, stopping at ports along the 5,250 kilometre-route to educate people about the damage that plastic pollution is doing to the environment and encourage action to reduce the consumption of disposable plastics. It also aims to show that plastic waste can have value as a commodity once used.

The boat is being built on the island of Lamu, on the Kenya coast, traditionally the most important center for dhow building in the region. Lamu is the oldest and best-preserved Swahili settlement in East Africa, having been inhabited since 1370, and boat building is still dominated by traditional techniques.

Waste plastics will be used to construct the entire boat. The keel, ribs and structural elements will be made from recycled plastic products including bottles and bags, and the hull and decking will be covered completely by recycled flip-flops. Despite the unusual materials, the vessel is being constructed by local craftsmen using traditional methods. This means no power tools and no computers… just centuries old knowledge. 

The team is working to have a 7-metre prototype of the dhow ready for launch on June 5, World Environment Day, which this year is focused on plastic pollution. Once the prototype of the boat is tested on open waters, the team will start work on a full-size dhow, which is typically about 18 metres in length.

“As a Kenyan, being part of this movement and helping create a pan-African plastic revolution is not just about addressing one the most pressing problems of our time, it’s about creating a paradigm shift about consumption through celebrating everything good about African traditional values.” Said Dipesh Pabari, Joint Project Leader and one of the founders of Flipflopi. “There is nothing new about the circular economy, we never threw anything away before, everything was reused and recycle. The dhow, as a traditional vessel that has connected continents and cultures for hundreds of years, reminds us to hang on to what works for the planet. Joining hands with UN Environment’s Clean Seas campaign is very exciting as we all share the same values and know that it’s not too late!”

The Flipflopi expedition has attracted widespread attention by media, both across Africa and globally. Kenyan celebrities have joined the project and it is proving to be highly effective to not only showcase the challenges faced by plastic pollution but also the opportunities to reuse the waste. However, the project has a major funding gap to achieve its ambition and has launched a crowd-funding drive.

 

 

To learn more about the Flipflopi Expedition or to donate, visit: here

To learn more about World Environment Day this year and how you can get involved, visit here

 

New Zealand joins CleanSeas Campaign

Auckland 12 March 2018 -  New Zealand has joined the United Nations-led CleanSeas campaign to rid our oceans of plastic, Associate Environment Minister Eugenie Sage announced. Ms Sage signed a pledge showing New Zealand’s commitment to the global CleanSeas campaign at the Volvo Ocean Race Village in Auckland. More than 40 other countries have already signed up.

“Turtles and other wildlife are being killed by litter in our oceans. Also, the issue of microplastic in our oceans and its effect on the food chain is a concern for all species and is a potential risk to human health. New Zealand is proud to be joining this campaign to stop this from happening,” Ms Sage said.

Scientists estimate that there are over 150 million tonnes of plastics in the ocean today. If nothing changes then plastic in oceans will weigh more than all the fish that live in them by 2050.

"We are excited to have New Zealand join us in the fight against ocean pollution,” Erik Solheim, head of UN Environment said. “By joining the CleanSeas campaign, they are affirming their pledges to reduce waste and we hope that other nations can also follow suit and join the campaign."

Ms Sage said the Government was taking steps to prevent litter entering oceans by hitting it at its source on land. Measures included:

  • Banning products containing plastic microbeads – this will come into effect in June.
  • Developing options to get rid of single use plastic bags.
  • Supporting data gathering on marine debris along our coastlines and oceans.
  • Funding initiatives through the Waste Minimisation Fund (WMF) including Keep New Zealand Beautiful, Sustainable Coastlines and the Packaging Forum.
  • Reviewing implementation of the Waste Minimisation Act to use its powers better and      promote waste minimisation.

“This Government has pledged to significantly reduce waste to landfill by 2020. It’s an ambitious goal and will take a concerted effort.

“We need to move to a circular economy where we make, use and return products and materials instead of the current model where we take resources, use them, then dispose of them. That is the focus of the latest round of the Waste Minimisation Fund which I also announced today.”

Bahrain steps up to save our oceans by joining #CleanSeas

Manama, 25 Feb 2018 Bahrain is taking a bold stand against marine litter and for the health of our oceans by joining some 40 other nations in becoming a member of the CleanSeas Campaign, pledging to keep our oceans healthy and litter-free.

 

In support of the Clean Seas Campaign, the Government of Bahrain will be implementing a range of initiatives to increase awareness on marine litter and its impacts through national campaigns on reducing plastics use; engaging with partners to undertake focused Clean Seas activities including beach clean-up days and other events; organize events to advocate for reducing the use of single use plastics and plastics packaging and promote the recycling of plastics and other materials, and continue the national focus on protection of national marine reserves and natural resources.

 

The announcement took place at the premises of the Supreme Council for the Environment. Dr. Mohamed Bin Daina, Chief Executive Officer of the Supreme Council made the announcement, joined by Mr. Erik Solheim, Executive Director of UN Environment, and Mr. Sami Dimassi, the Director and Regional Representative of UN Environment.

 

It’s not me, it’s you! The world breaks up with single-use plastics.

Nairobi 10 Feb 2018 -  A day characterized with love, care and tenderness turned out to be ideal occasion for ending a toxic relationship.  In the new CleanSeas’ promotional video, ‘It’s not me, it’s you’, launched for Valentine’s day, Sandra realizes she has been addicted to single-use plastics for too long and decides it's time for a break-up. What's more, she has found a new love. Her story takes a lighter look at the issue of marine litter and asks everyone around the world to break-up with single-use plastics and make their pledge at cleanseas.org.

In just a few days, the video has attracted unprecedented social media attention, with over 3 Million views across Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. In addition, celebrities such as Día Mirza took it up on their social media channels, spreading the word about the Break up, and individual pledges on the CleanSeas webpage spiked, gaining 10,000 new signatures in a few hours.

Join the movement too, sign the CleanSeas pledge!

TAKE BACK SCHEME TO REMEDY PLASTIC POLLUTION IN KENYA?

Nairobi, 9 February 2018 -  Kenya has committed to drastically reduce plastic pollution through its environmental watchdog NEMA, since its ban on plastic bags in August last year. Despite the strides it has made, there is still much to be done. This is mainly because of the growing demand and production of plastic bottles, with data from the Ministry indicating that approximately 50 million plastic bottles are used annually across the country.

Various solutions have been explored, ranging from new recycling facilities to a full ban on plastic bottles.  The Kenyan Government is now proposing a take-back scheme to deal with the issue, whereby citizens will be involved in collecting waste bottles and selling them for recycling through a new plant to be established.

Read full article here

 

Over 65 Phuket Hotels join UN #CleanSeas campaign, pledge to reduce single-use plastic

Phuket, Thailand, 14 December 2017 - Dozens of hotels in one of Thailand’s most popular beach destinations have joined UN Environment’s #CleanSeas campaign, pledging to reduce the tide of plastic waste flowing into our oceans.

The Phuket Hotels Association is a non-profit organization with over 65 small boutique hotels and large luxury international chains like JW Marriot, Hyatt, Hilton, Novotel, Swissotel and more. One of the key strategies of the Association is to minimize and eventually eliminate disposable plastic water bottles and other forms of plastic at the hotels.

“By joining forces with the UN Clean Seas campaign, our Hotels Association is continuing in our efforts to make a difference in and around Phuket. Our environment defines our destination and our management and staff of approximately 20,000 in Phuket are committed to working with local government and international organizations to move towards a cleaner Island” said Anthony Lark, President of the Phuket Hotels Association.

"It's great to welcome the Phuket Hotels Association to the #CleanSeas campaign. Business participation is vital to turning the tide on plastic pollution in our oceans, and the tourism sector has a vital stake and key role in ensuring that beaches, coastlines and the seas are kept in pristine condition," said Erik Solheim, head of UN Environment. "We need everyone to get involved and take action: citizens, the private sector and governments."

The Association will also provide environmental impact training for employees to educate them to reduce harmful effects that tourism has on the island and ocean. Each hotel has been asked to make individual commitments toward minimizing single-use plastic: at work, at home and in the community.

Nearly 40 countries from Kenya to Canada and Indonesia to Brazil and a number of key private sector and institutions, including DELL, Volvo Ocean Race and the World Association of Zoos and Aquaria have joined the #CleanSeas campaign, which aims to counter the torrents of plastic trash that are degrading our oceans and endangering the life they sustain. The countries account for more than half of the world’s coastline.

The flow of pollution means detritus such as drinks bottles and flip-flops – as well as tiny plastic fragments, including microbeads used in cosmetics – are concentrating in the oceans and washing up on shorelines around the world, from deserted Pacific islets to the Arctic Circle.

Humans have already dumped billions of tonnes of plastic, and are adding it to the ocean at a rate of 8 million tonnes a year. As well as endangering fish, birds and other creatures who mistake it for food or become entangled in it, plastic waste has also entered the human food chain with health consequences that are not yet fully understood. It also harms tourist destinations and provides breeding grounds for mosquitoes carrying diseases including dengue and Zika.

The #CleanSeas campaign aims to “turn the tide on plastic” by inspiring action from governments, businesses and individuals on ocean pollution.

For more information please contact: Satwant Kaur, satwant.kaur@unep.org, +662 2882127, +66817001376

UN Press Release - Chile, Oman, Sri Lanka, South Africa join #CleanSeas campaign against ocean pollution

On Wednesday 6 December 2017, during the UN Environment Assembly, Chile, Oman, Sri Lanka and South Africa joined UN Environment's CleanSeas campaign against marine litter and ocean pollution. The four countries announced measures including plastic bag bans, new marine reserves and drives to increase recycling. Read the full article here

The Guardian - Lobster found with Pepsi logo 'tattoo' fuels fears over ocean litter

In the waters off Grand Manan, New Brunswick, a Canadian fishing crew found a lobster with the blue and red Pepsi logo imprinted on its claw. The find has started a debate over how the logo got there: some believe the lobster might have grown around a can that ended up at the bottom of the ocean; others speculate that part of a Pepsi box somehow become stuck on the lobster. Read the full article here.

Europe and UN Environment together against marine litter

On Wednesday 8 November, IUCN – the International Union for Conservation of Nature – organized the event ‘Marine Plastics Need European Action’ at the European Parliament, opened by European Commissioner for the Environment, Karmenu Vella. Representatives from Plastics Europe, Seas at Risk, the Portuguese Ministry of Maritime Policy, UN Environment and the European Parliament and Commission were present.
 
During the event, Mr. Vella stated that the EU is “working closely with the UN Environment Programme, and supporting the implementation of UNEA resolutions on marine litter and microplastics”. In addition, he announced that the EU has donated its “highly successful global ‘aquariums against marine litter’ campaign to UN Environment to build awareness around the world”.

In the meanwhile, UN Environment continues to move international action towards a pollution-free planet, most notably through its Environment Assembly (4-6 December, Nairobi), and by encouraging individuals to beat pollution in their daily lives by using instruments such as the CleanSeas platform. 

The full article, published on europe.eu, and the speech given by Karmenu Vella are available at the following links:

https://europa.eu/capacity4dev/unep/discussions/marine-litter-ingredients-oceans-plastic-soup
 
https://ec.europa.eu/commission/commissioners/2014-2019/vella/announcements/marine-plastic-need-european-action-wednesday-8th-november-2017_en

The New York Times - Public Shaming and Even Prison for Plastic Bag Use in Rwanda

In Rwanda, it is illegal to import, produce, use or sell plastic bags and plastic packaging except within specific industries like hospitals and pharmaceuticals. The Nation is one of more than 40 around the world that have banned, restricted or taxed the use of plastic bags, including China, France and Italy. But Rwanda's approach is on another level. Traffickers caught carrying illegal plastic are liable to be fined, jailed or forced to make public confessions. Read the full article here.

Sail-word.com - Sky Ocean Rescue to partner with ‘Turn the Tide on Plastic’ VOR team

Led by the race's only female skipper, veteran British sailor Dee Caffari MBE, Turn the Tide on Plastic will use on-board data gathering equipment to measure water quality and composition, as well as micro-plastics in some of the world's remotest oceans. Read the full article here.

Sailingscuttlebutt.com - ‘Clean Seas’ Campaign for Volvo Ocean Race

The Volvo Ocean Race has used the first of seven Ocean Summits it is hosting around the world in 2017-18 to launch a unique program that will gather data from parts of the oceans that are otherwise inaccessible to scientists, while the Spanish government pledged its backing for UN Environment’s Clean Seas campaign. Read the full article here.

 

Futurism.com - The U.K. Just Installed Its First “Seabin” to Clean Plastic-Polluted Waters

Our oceans fill with millions of tons of plastic every single year. Portsmouth Harbor, in the UK, aims to combat this problem with the seabin, a new device that sucks plastic, oil, and other debris from the water. Read the full article here.

Spain signs up to UN Clean Seas campaign

18 October 2017, Alicante – The Government of Spain officially announced its support to the UN Clean Seas campaign today at the Volvo Ocean Race Ocean Summit being held in Alicante.

As the world’s 14th largest economy, Spain’s declaration of support is a significant boost to the UN’s global campaign, which now boasts 32 member states and aims to “turn the tide on plastic” by inspiring action from governments, businesses and individuals.

“Over the past six years we have been developing Spain’s new Marine Strategy, and one of its main goals is to tackle marine litter,” said Raquel Orts Nebot, Spain’s Director General for Coast and Sea Sustainability. “In this regard, I confirm that Spain is joining the UN Clean Seas Campaign, with the firm purpose of supporting this global initiative and contributing to its impact worldwide.”

“Spain's engagement in this campaign sends an important message across the Mediterranean region and the world,” said head of UN Environment, Erik Solheim. “Our oceans are fundamental to our survival that we must do everything we can to protect them.”

Plastic has long been identified as a major cause of environmental damage and health problems. It pollutes the environment; kills birds, fish and other animals that mistake plastic for food; damages tourist spots; and harms marine fisheries.

Plastic use, however, continues to grow. Up to 2015, mankind had produced 8.3 billion tons of plastic. Of this, 6.3 billion tons have already been discarded and some 8 million tons are dumped into our oceans every year.

Much of this waste is made up of disposable plastic, including cups, bags, straws, bottles and microplastics (tiny particles of plastic) from cosmetic products. At current rates, by 2050 there will be more plastic in the oceans than fish.

In the Mediterranean, researchers have recently highlighted a growing mass of plastic waste with similar concentrations to the infamous North Pacific Gyre.

The Clean Seas campaign asks the support of governments through the creation of effective national laws and encouragement for businesses and citizens to develop new and more sustainable patterns of production and consumption.

Major pledges from countries who have joined the campaign include Indonesia’s commitment to slash marine litter by 70%, Canada’s addition of microbeads to its list of toxic substances, and bans on microplastics in New Zealand, the UK and the US.

30 countries helping #BeatPollution through UN Environment’s CleanSeas campaign

Thirty countries from Kenya to Indonesia and from Canada to Brazil are helping #beatpollution by countering the torrents of plastic trash that are degrading our oceans and endangering the life they sustain.

The countries – all members of UN Environment’s #CleanSeas campaign – account for about 40 per centof the world’s coastlines. They are drawing up laws, establishing marine reserves, banning plastic bags and gathering up the waste choking their beaches and reefs.

The populous nations of East and South-East Asia account for most of the plastic trash entering the global ocean. To address this menace at source, Indonesia has pledged to reduce its generation of plastic trash by 70 per cent by 2030, while the Philippines plans new laws targeting single-use plastics.

Humanity’s unhealthy addiction to throwaway plastics bags is a particular target. Countries including Kenya, France, Jordan, Madagascar and the Maldives have committed to banning plastic bags or restricting consumers to re-usable versions for which they have to pay.

Legislation to press companies and citizens to change their wasteful habits is often part of broader government strategies to foster responsible production and consumption – a key step in the global shift toward sustainable development.

Belgium and Brazil, for instance, are both working on national action plans to curb marine pollution. Costa Rica has embarked on a five-year strategy to improve waste management that includes a push to reduce the use of plastics.

The flow of pollution means detritus such as drinks bottles and flip-flops as well as tiny plastic fragments including microbeads used in cosmetics are concentrating in the oceans and washing up on the most remote shorelines, from deserted Pacific islets to the Arctic Circle.

Israel is among the countries supporting programmes to keep beaches clean, along with Canada and Belgium. The latter is also helping remove abandoned fishing gear from shipwrecks in European waters.

Humans have already dumped billions of tons of plastic, and we are adding it to the ocean at a rate of 8 million tons a year. As well as endangering fish, birds and other creatures who mistake it for food or become entangled in it, plastic waste has also entered the human food chain with health consequences that are not yet fully understood. It also harms tourist destinations and provides breeding grounds for mosquitoes carrying diseases including dengue and Zika.

The #CleanSeas campaign aims to “turn the tide on plastic” by inspiring action from governments, businesses and individuals on ocean pollution.

Pollution is the theme of the 2017 United Nations Environment Assembly, which is meeting in Nairobi, Kenya from 4 to 6 December. All governments as well as individuals, businesses and other organizations are invited to sign the pledge and help #BeatPollution around the world.

Canada joins the CleanSeas campaign!

UN Environment is delighted to welcome Canada as the 26th country to join the CleanSeas campaign against marine litter.

With over 200,000km of coastline, Canada has the longest shores in the world, and has been at the forefront of international efforts to protect the marine environment. Having the Canadians onboard is a real milestone for CleanSeas and great news for the world’s oceans.

“The Government of Canada regards [CleanSeas] as an important initiative that solidifies its commitment to take action in order to keep waters clean and safe for generations to come,” said Canada’s Environment Minister, Catherine McKenna, announcing new commitments to prevent pollution, research the impact of microplastics, and fund community-based programs, including shorefront clean-ups.

UN Environment and CleanSeas are very proud to have the support of such a powerful advocate for the health of our oceans.

“After the excellent cooperation for World Environment Day 2017, we are thrilled by this announcement,” said Erik Solheim, head of UN Environment. “Canada’s continued commitment confirms that we are heading in the right direction with the fight against marine pollution. We look forward to working together to turn the tide on plastic pollution in our oceans.”

Each year, at least 8 million tonnes of plastic end up in the oceans. If no action is taken, by 2050 there could be more plastic than fish in the sea. CleanSeas works with governments, the private sector and civil society to radically change our relationship with plastics by improving industrial processes, phasing out non-recoverable plastics, and drastically cutting back on single-use plastic within the next five years.

UN Environment launches second online course on marine litter

Want to learn more about one of our most pressing environmental issues? Then sign up for UN Environment’s second massive open online course. The enrollment deadline has been extended to 8 June.

Read the full article here

 

Effort to clean up ocean plastic to begin in 12 months, years ahead of schedule

A Dutch foundation dedicated to removing plastic pollution from the world’s oceans announced a new system design today that will allow them to begin an ambitious cleanup plan in the next 12 months, two years ahead of schedule.
 

Read the full article here

 

Keep plastics out of oceans

The UN Environment Programme, UNEP, has cautioned that there will be more plastic than fish in the world’s oceans by 2050 unless people stop using single-use plastic items such as plastic bags and plastic bottles, commented a UAE daily.
 

Read the full article here

 

UN Urges Action as Microplastics in the Ocean Outnumber the Stars

If you’ve ever laid on a blanket and looked up at the night sky, you know how mind-blowing it is to consider the sheer number of stars in our galaxy – between 100 and 400 billion, according to scientists. Now, think about how heartbreaking it is to find out that there are more microscopic pieces of plastic in our oceans than there are stars in the Milky Way.
 

Read the full article here

 

FEATURE-Kenya seeks to cure plastic bag addiction with blanket ban

NAKURU, Kenya, May 2 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The sight of overflowing heaps of plastic waste at Gioto, the largest dump in Nakuru County, in Kenya's Great Rift Valley, was an eyesore that turned photojournalist James Wakibia into an environmental activist.
 

Read the full article here

 

The Nordic Council of Ministers supports the UN’s #CleanSeas campaign

Working toward cleaner seas in the Nordic Region and the world

The Nordic Council of Ministers supports the UN’s #CleanSeas campaign. The Nordic activities will be publicised on social media using the hashtags #CleanSeas and #Norden2017! The material on this site is also free to use.
 

Read the full article here

Women in Uganda Are Turning Plastic Straw Waste Into Art – Creating Jobs and Cleaning the Planet (VIDEO)

Plastic is, without a doubt, making our life a lot easier. But that, of course, is not the end of the story. Currently, it is also one of the biggest threats to our planet. Globally, we produce 300 million tons of plastic per year and leave 78 percent of it unrecycled. Every year, around 8.8 million tons of plastic end up in the oceans, endangering countless marine animals. It’s estimated that 700 species of marine animals are now faced with extinction because of the threat of ingestion of and entanglement in plastic trash. Whether we like it or not, it is time to reconsider our relationship with disposable plastics – every single plastic bag, bottle, and straw.

Read the full article here

Kenya seeks to cure plastic bag addiction with blanket ban

NAKURU, Kenya - The sight of overflowing heaps of plastic waste at Gioto, the largest dump in Nakuru County, in Kenya’s Great Rift Valley, was an eyesore that turned photojournalist James Waikibia into an environmental activist.

Read the full article here

 

These Awesome Breakthroughs in the Fight Against Plastic Pollution Will Give You Hope!

There is no doubt that we have reached crisis point with our plastic obsession. This material is seemingly ubiquitous in everyday society, used to wrap just about any product you can think of on grocery store shelves. Given the durability and convenience of plastic, it is easy to see why it has become so popular. However, the shocking truth is that unless we humans manage to ditch our attachment to plastic, it may end up destroying life on our planet as we know it.

Read the full article here

Tunisia bans disposable plastic shopping bags

In an effort to reduce plastic waste, shoppers will no longer be able to get single-use bags at supermarkets.

If you happen to be shopping for groceries in Tunisia, you won’t be able to get a free, thin plastic bag in which to take home your purchases. As of 1 March 2017, single-use plastic bags have been banned in supermarkets, making it the first Arab nation to take such a step.

Read the full article here

New Zealand will ban plastic microbeads by 2018

If cosmetics companies won't self-regulate, then it's up to countries to take a strong stance against these nasty miniature pollutants.

New Zealand is the latest country to take action against insidious plastic microbeads. Earlier this year, environment minister Nick Smith announced that microbeads would no longer be allowed in any cosmetics or personal care items, starting July 1, 2018, and that any company caught sneaking them into products would be fined NZ $100,000 (US $73,000).

Read the full article here

Kenya announces breakthrough ban on plastic bags

15 March 2017 – The Government of Kenya announced today a ban on the use, manufacture and import of all plastic bags, to take effect in six months. This announcement comes just three weeks after the UN declared a “war on plastic” through its new Clean Seas initiative, which has already secured commitments to address major plastic pollution from 10 governments.

Some 100 million plastic bags are handed out every year in Kenya by supermarkets alone. Long identified as a major cause of environmental damage and health problems, they kill birds, fish and other animals that mistake them for food, damage agricultural land, pollute tourist sites and provide breeding grounds for the mosquitoes that carry malaria and dengue fever.

Read the full article here

 

Campaign Art: By 2050 more plastic in the oceans than fish?

Did you know that 60-90% of marine litter is plastic?

Did you know that each year about 8 million tons of plastic ends up in the oceans?

Did you know that each year, over 4 billion coffee cups end up in landfills?

Did you know that up to 51 trillion micro plastic particles are already in our oceans?

Did you know that by 2050, an estimated 99% of seabirds will have ingested plastic?

Why do these numbers matter? With increased human activity both on land and seas, and unsustainable production and consumption habits, our oceans and other world’s bodies of water are getting more and more polluted.

Read the full article here

Beach clean-ups in Mumbai inspired global Clean Seas campaign: UNEP head

The Clean Seas global campaign that was launched in Indonesia during the last week of February was inspired by beach clean-up efforts in Mumbai over the past 18 months, said top officials from the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) on Tuesday.

UNEP head Erik Solheim, on his second visit to Mumbai, told Hindustan Times about the plans for the global beach clean-up drive and the way ahead for Indian cities to tackle other environment related issues.

“Inspired by Afroz Shah and other Mumbai residents, who have kept Versova Beach plastic free for over a year now, we launched our international campaign, a global war against marine litter, in Bali, Indonesia on February 25,” said Solheim. “Similar to the Versova Residents Volunteers (VRV), a parallel group in Bali has been initiated and chalked out a plan to clear their beaches of plastic.”

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Africa: UN Declares War On Ocean Plastic

Rome — The available data is enough for the United Nations to literally declare war on oceans plastic: more than 8 million tonnes of leaks into their waters each year – equal to dumping a garbage truck of plastic every minute, wreaking havoc on marine wildlife, fisheries and tourism, and costing at least 8 billion dollars in damage to marine ecosystems.

In fact, the Nairobi-based United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) on February 23 launched an unprecedented global campaign to eliminate major sources of marine litter: micro-plastics in cosmetics and the excessive, wasteful usage of single-use plastic by the year 2022.

Read the full article here

Video captures moment plastic enters food chain

A scientist has filmed the moment plastic microfibre is ingested by plankton, illustrating how the material is affecting life beneath the waves.

The footage shows one way that waste plastic could be entering the marine and global food chain.

An estimated 150 million tonnes of plastic "disappears" from the world's waste stream each year.

Waste plastic in the world's seas has been recognised by the United Nations as a major environmental problem.

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Indonesia pledges $1bn a year to curb ocean waste

Only China dumps more plastic in the ocean than Indonesia. But by 2025, the world’s largest archipelago aims to reduce marine waste by 70%

Indonesia has pledged up to $1bn a year to dramatically reduce the amount of plastic and other waste products polluting its waters. The announcement was made by Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan, Indonesia’s coordinating minister for maritime affairs at last week’s 2017 World Oceans Summit in Nusa Dua, Bali.

Pandjaitan told delegates at the conference that Indonesia would achieve a 70% reduction in marine waste within eight years. He proposed developing new industries that use biodegradable materials such as cassava and seaweed to produce plastic alternatives. Other measures could include a nationwide tax on plastic bags as well as a sustained public education campaign.

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Digital News Agency: Actor Adrian Grenier and the Ocean Community Make a Pledge of Protection on Day One of The Economist's World Ocean Summit

BALI, Indonesia, Thursday 23rd February, 2017 -The 2017 World Ocean Summit started with a call to action. There have been many conversations about creating a sustainable ‘ blue economy’, but the time has come to start doing something about it. 

There are huge economic and growth opportunities from investing into the ocean, but also a massive environmental responsibility that needs to be considered. 

Panels and interviews included in-depth discussions about plastics and other marine litter, financing the transition to more environmentally-friendly ocean industries, and the complications of moving to more sustainable fishing practices.

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الأمم المتحدة اطلقت حملة بحار نظيفة للقضاء على المصادر الرئيسية للنفايات البحرية

طلقت الأمم المتحدة للبيئة اليوم حملة "بحار نظيفة" للقضاء على المصادر الرئيسية للنفايات البحرية: الحبيبات الدقيقة المستخدمة في مستحضرات التجميل، والاستخدام المفرط والمسرف للبلاستيك الذي يستخدم لمرة واحدة بحلول العام 2022، بمشاركة عشرة بلدان وشركة DELL العاملة في مجال الكمبيوتر، وعارضة الأزياء ناديا هوتاغالونغ، والممثل أدريان غرينير والمغني جاك جونسون.

وتحض حملة "بحار نظيفة" التي تم إطلاقها خلال قمة الاقتصاديين العالمية المعنية بالمحيط في مدينة بالي، الحكومات على الالتزام بسياسات الحد من استخدام البلاستيك، والتي تستهدف الشركات الصناعية لتقليل إنتاج البلاستيك. وتدعو المستهلكين لوضع حد لهذه العادة المتمثلة في استخدام البلاستيك قبل أن ينتهي بها المطاف في البحار.

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راغب علامة يطلق حملة جديدة والجمهور ينضم إليه تفاعل كبير حظيت به الحملة وقد ظهر ذلك بوضوح من خلال التعليقات التي إنهالت على راغب علامة من كل حدب وصوب من الجمهور ومحبّيه

متابعة بتجـــــــــــــــــردأعلن السوبر ستار راغب علامة بالتعاون مع المنظمة العالمية للأمم  المتحدة لشؤون البيئة عن اطلاق حملة بعنوان “بحار نظيفة” كشف من خلالها عن “تدابير طموحة” للقضاء على استخدام أكياس البلاستيك التي تستخدم لمرة واحدة.

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Ecowatch: Microplastics in Oceans Outnumber Stars in Our Galaxy by 500 Times

The United Nations is "declaring war" on the biggest sources of planetary pollution—ocean plastic. On Thursday, the intergovernmental organization's environment program (UNEP) launched its #CleanSeas campaign at the World Ocean Summit hosted by The Economist in Bali, Indonesia.

The unprecedented global initiative urges governments and businesses to take measures to eliminate microplastics from cosmetics and personal care items, ban or tax single-use plastic bags and dramatically reduce other disposable plastic items by 2022. Everyday citizens are also encouraged to join the fight.

Read the full article here

Sky News: UN takes aim at 'wasteful' plastics in world's oceans

The UN wants to eliminate two major sources of marine litter from the oceans by 2022.

Under fire are microplastics in cosmetics and single-use plastics, such as water bottles and plastic bags, with the UN calling their use "wasteful" and "excessive".

The announcement comes as Sky's Ocean Rescue campaign highlights the widespread problems caused by plastic in the world's oceans.

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The Hindu: UNEP starts campaign to end marine litter

The UN Environment Programme on Thursday launched an unprecedented global campaign to eliminate major sources of marine litter — microplastics in cosmetics and the excessive, wasteful usage of single-use plastic — by 2022.

Launched at the Economist World Ocean Summit in this Indonesian island known for coral reefs, the #CleanSeas campaign is urging governments to pass plastic reduction policies; targeting industry to minimise plastic packaging and redesign products; and calling on consumers to change their throwaway habits — before irreversible damage is done to our seas.

Read the full article here

UN News Centre: ‘Turn the tide on plastic’ urges UN, as microplastics in the seas now outnumber stars in our galaxy

23 February 2017 – Launching an unprecedented global campaign, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is urging everyone to eliminate the use of microplastics and stop the excessive, wasteful use of single-use plastic, to save the world’s seas and oceans from irreversible damage before it’s too late.

“Plastic pollution is surfing onto Indonesian beaches, settling onto the ocean floor at the North Pole, and rising through the food chain onto our dinner tables,” Erik Solheim, the Executive Director of UNEP, said in a news release announcing the campaign.

“We’ve stood by too long as the problem has gotten worse. It must stop,” he added.

Read the full article here

Sustainability Foundation mobilizes the efforts to implement beach clean up campaign to remove plastic

On the occasion of the National Environment Day which held on February 20, 2017 and with approaching the date of the World Summit conference on oceans, and in response to the call of the United Nations Environment Programme which will launch a global campaign on February 23, 2017 aimed at turning the tide on plastic, the Sustainability Foundation encourages and call on authorities to try to reduce the use of plastic in its various forms.

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Al Jazeera: Plan to reduce marine plastic waste launched in Indonesia

The United Nations has a new plan to stop oceans filling up with rubbish.

They want to stop people using some plastic bags and microbeads in cosmetic products within the next five years.

Ten countries have signed up to the Clean Seas Initiative, including Indonesia, which is the world's second largest producer of plastic waste.

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Mares limpios

Cada año, más de 8 millones de toneladas de plástico terminan en los océanos. Esto causa estragos en la flora y fauna marina, la pesca y el turismo. El 90% de la basura que flota en nuestros océanos es plástico.

Uruguay incrementó su trabajo, en estos últimos años, en la gestión ambientalmente adecuada de los diferentes tipos de residuos, en particular los microplásticos y la afectación que producen a nuestros mares y océanos. El proyecto de Ley de residuos en elaboración; la Ley de bolsas plásticas a estudio del Parlamento; y el trabajo que lidera el Mvotma desde el año 2009 en “Limpieza de costas”, son acciones y compromisos concretos en los que nuestro país está embarcado.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

La ONU declara la guerra al plástico en los océanos

Bali, Indonesia, 23 de febrero de 2017 – ONU Medio Ambiente lanzó hoy una campaña mundial sin precedentes para eliminar de ahora a 2022 las principales fuentes de basura marina: las microperlas utilizadas en productos cosméticos y el uso excesivo de plásticos de un solo uso.

Presentada en Bali durante la Cumbre Mundial del Océano, organizada por The Economist, la campaña #MaresLimpios exhorta a los gobiernos a comprometerse con políticas para la reducción del plástico, pide a la industria minimizar los envases elaborados con este material y rediseñar sus productos, y apela a los consumidores a que abandonen el hábito de usar y tirar productos plásticos, antes de que perjudiquen irreversiblemente a nuestros océanos.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

Panama´s director of Oceans from the Ministry of Environment, Ricardo de Ycaza, endorsed the campaign in an interview with a local newspaper.

IPS: La ONU le declara la guerra al plástico de los océanos

ROMA, 23 feb 2017 (IPS) - La ONU declara la guerra a los plásticos que inundan los océanos: más de ocho millones de toneladas terminan en sus aguas cada año, como si se vertiera un camión de ese material por minuto, lo que causa estragos en la vida marina, la pesca y el turismo, y tiene un costo de unos 8.000 millones de dólares.

De hecho, el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (Pnuma), con sede en Nairobi, lanzó este jueves 23 una campaña mundial para eliminar para 2022 las principales fuentes de la contaminación marina, como son los microplásticos contenidos en productos cosméticos y el despilfarro de artículos descartados con un solo uso.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

NTN24: Mares limpios - ONU lanza campaña para acabar con las principales fuentes de residuos en los océanos

El Programa de Naciones para el Medio Ambiente (Pnuma) lanzó este miércoles una campaña mundial para eliminar en 2022 las principales fuentes de basura en los océanos, entre las que predomina el plástico.

Bajo el lema "#MaresLimpios, ¡Cambia la marea del plástico!", la ONU pidió a los Gobiernos que lleven a cabo políticas para la reducción del plásticos, y apeló a los consumidores a que abandonen el hábito de usar y tirar productos plásticos "antes de que perjudique irreversiblemente a nuestros océanos".

Lea el artículo completo aquí

El Espectador: Uruguay lidera lucha contra la basura marina en A. Latina

El Caribe y el Pacífico centroamericano son los mares que acumulan la mayor cantidad de basura de todo el continente, en su gran mayoría plásticos y microperlas usadas en productos cosméticos, alertó hoy en Panamá un experto de ONU Ambiente.

"Cada mar tiene sus propios desafíos, pero en el Pacífico sur, desde Colombia a Chile, no hay tanta basura marina como en el Pacífico centroamericano y en el Caribe", explicó a Efe el experto en Ecosistemas de ONU Ambiente, Alberto Pacheco.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

El Mostrador: ONU lanza campaña mundial para acabar con residuos de plástico en los océanos

El Programa de Naciones para el Medio Ambiente (Pnuma) lanzó hoy una campaña mundial para eliminar en 2022 las principales fuentes de basura en los océanos, entre las que predomina el plástico.

Bajo el lema "#MaresLimpios, ¡Cambia la marea del plástico!", la ONU pidió a los Gobiernos que lleven a cabo políticas para la reducción del plásticos, y apeló a los consumidores a que abandonen el hábito de usar y tirar productos plásticos "antes de que perjudique irreversiblemente a nuestros océanos".

Lea el artículo completo aquí

El País: ONU: Los mares de Centroamérica son los que más basura tienen del continente

Panamá, 22 feb (EFE).- El Caribe y el Pacífico centroamericano son los mares que acumulan la mayor cantidad de basura de todo el continente, en su gran mayoría plásticos y microperlas usadas en productos cosméticos, alertó hoy en Panamá un experto de ONU Ambiente.

“Cada mar tiene sus propios desafíos, pero en el Pacífico sur, desde Colombia a Chile, no hay tanta basura marina como en el Pacífico centroamericano y en el Caribe”, explicó a Efe el experto en Ecosistemas de ONU Ambiente, Alberto Pacheco.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

La Estrella: ONU declara lucha global contra el plástico y Panamá se une a la causa

La Organización de las Naciones Unidas (ONU) declaró oficialmente la guerra al plástico en los océanos y Panamá se une a la iniciativa mundial para eliminar, de ahora a 2022, las principales fuentes de basura marina: las microperlas utilizadas en productos cosméticos y el uso excesivo de plásticos de un solo uso.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

El Nuevo Diario: ONU lanza campaña mundial para acabar con residuos de plástico en los océanos

EL NUEVO DIARIO, NAIROBI.- El Programa de Naciones para el Medio Ambiente (Pnuma) lanzó hoy una campaña mundial para eliminar en 2022 las principales fuentes de basura en los océanos, entre las que predomina el plástico.

Bajo el lema "#MaresLimpios, ¡Cambia la marea del plástico!", la ONU pidió a los Gobiernos que lleven a cabo políticas para la reducción del plásticos, y apeló a los consumidores a que abandonen el hábito de usar y tirar productos plásticos "antes de que perjudique irreversiblemente a nuestros océanos".

Lea el artículo completo aquí

Telemetro TV: Los mares de Centroamérica son los que más basura tienen del continente

El Caribe y el Pacífico centroamericano son los mares que acumulan la mayor cantidad de basura de todo el continente, en su gran mayoría plásticos y microperlas usadas en productos cosméticos, alertó hoy en Panamá un experto de ONU Ambiente.

"Cada mar tiene sus propios desafíos, pero en el Pacífico sur, desde Colombia a Chile, no hay tanta basura marina como en el Pacífico centroamericano y en el Caribe", explicó a Efe el experto en Ecosistemas de ONU Ambiente, Alberto Pacheco.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

El Espectador: ONU lanza una campaña para limpiar el plástico de los océanos

Según el organismo, el plástico supone el 80% de la basura en los océanos y causa daños por valor de 8.000 millones de dólares en el ecosistema marino.

La ONU lanzó este jueves una campaña global dirigida a gobiernos, empresas y consumidores para reducir los residuos de plástico en los océanos, donde cada año se tiran unas ocho toneladas de este material.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

Opinión Pública TV: La ONU ‘declara la guerra’ al plástico en los océanos

Bali, Indonesia.- ONU Medio Ambiente lanzó este día una campaña mundial sin precedentes para eliminar de ahora a 2022 las principales fuentes de basura marina: las microperlas utilizadas en productos cosméticos y el uso excesivo de plásticos de un solo uso.

Presentada en Bali durante la Cumbre Mundial del Océano, organizada por The Economist, la campaña #MaresLimpios exhorta a los gobiernos a comprometerse con políticas para la reducción del plástico, pide a la industria minimizar los envases elaborados con este material y rediseñar sus productos, y apela a los consumidores a que abandonen el hábito de usar y tirar productos plásticos, antes de que perjudiquen irreversiblemente a nuestros océanos.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

Informador: La ONU lanza campaña para acabar con residuos de plástico en océanos

NAIROBI, KENIA (22/FEB/2017).- El Programa de Naciones para el Medio Ambiente (Pnuma) lanzó hoy una campaña mundial para eliminar en 2022 las principales fuentes de basura en los océanos, entre las que predomina el plástico.

Bajo el lema "#MaresLimpios, ¡Cambia la marea del plástico!", la ONU pidió a los Gobiernos que lleven a cabo políticas para la reducción del plásticos, y apeló a los consumidores a que abandonen el hábito de usar y tirar productos plásticos "antes de que perjudique irreversiblemente a nuestros océanos".

Lea el artículo completo aquí

Tempo.co: Govt to Reduce Plastic Wastes by 70 Percent

The Indonesian government is committed to reducing plastic wastes by 70 percent by the end of 2025, initiated with the launch of a national action plan for tackling plastic wastes in oceans.

Indonesia, along with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), has launched a campaign to remove plastic wastes in Nusa Dua, Bali, on Thursday.

"By the end of 2025, we will reduce 70 percent of the plastic wastes. Indonesia has launched a national action plan for tackling marine plastic wastes," Coordinating Minister for Maritime Affairs Luhut Binsar Panjaitan stated in a press release received by ANTARA, Thursday.

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The Economic Times: Tackling pollution, investing in renewables will help India's economy: UNEP chief Erik Solheim

NEW DELHI: India has some of the most polluted cities in the world. It also needs to create jobs. So it is not rocket science to figure out that tackling pollution and shifting investment towards renewables will help India's economy. For this, the Indian government needs to provide a conducive legislative framework and its financial markets and outside investors need to step in, says United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Executive Director Erik Solheim.

"With Indian firms l ..

NEW DELHI: India has some of the most polluted cities in the world. It also needs to create jobs. So it is not rocket science to figure out that tackling pollution and shifting investment towards renewables will help India's economy. For this, the Indian government needs to provide a conducive legislative framework and its financial markets and outside investors need to step in, says United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Executive Director Erik Solheim.

"With Indian firms l ..

EW DELHI: India has some of the most polluted cities in the world. It also needs to create jobs. So it is not rocket science to figure out that tackling pollution and shifting investment towards renewables will help India's economy. For this, the Indian government needs to provide a conducive legislative framework and its financial markets and outside investors need to step in, says United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Executive Director Erik Solheim.

Read more at:
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/57309166.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst
EW DELHI: India has some of the most polluted cities in the world. It also needs to create jobs. So it is not rocket science to figure out that tackling pollution and shifting investment towards renewables will help India's economy. For this, the Indian government needs to provide a conducive legislative framework and its financial markets and outside investors need to step in, says United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Executive Director Erik Solheim.

NEW DELHI: India has some of the most polluted cities in the world. It also needs to create jobs. So it is not rocket science to figure out that tackling pollution and shifting investment towards renewables will help India's economy. For this, the Indian government needs to provide a conducive legislative framework and its financial markets and outside investors need to step in, says United Nations Environment Programme  (UNEP) Executive Director Erik Solheim.

"With Indian firms like Infosys and Tata getting on board, it's easy to see where the market is going," Solheim told IANS in an exclusive online interview from Bali, Indonesia, where he is attending a global environmental conference. 

Read the full article here

 

The Indian Xpress: 10 countries join UN environment’s war on marine litter

BALI: The UN Environment on Thursday launched an unprecedented global campaign to eliminate major sources of marine litter: microplastics in cosmetics and the excessive, wasteful usage of single-use plastic by 2022.

Ten countries – Belgium, Costa Rica, France, Grenada, Indonesia, Norway, Panama, Saint Lucia, Sierra Leone and Uruguay – have joined the the #CleanSeas campaign, launched at the Economist World Ocean Summit in this Indonesian island known for coral reefs.

Read the full article here

EFEverde: La ONU lanza una campaña mundial para acabar con los plásticos en los océanos

El Programa de Naciones para el Medio Ambiente (Pnuma) lanzó hoy una campaña mundial para eliminar en 2022 las principales fuentes de basura en los océanos, entre las que predomina el plástico.

Bajo el lema “#MaresLimpios, ¡Cambia la marea del plástico!“, la ONU pidió a los Gobiernos que lleven a cabo políticas para la reducción del plásticos, y apeló a los consumidores a que abandonen el hábito de usar y tirar productos plásticos “antes de que perjudique irreversiblemente a nuestros océanos”.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

ANSA: L'Onu dichiara 'guerra' a plastica oceani con #CleanSeas

Oltre 8 milioni di tonnellate di plastica finiscono ogni anno nei mari del globo: come se ogni minuto si riversasse in acqua un camion pieno di rifiuti. Con queste stime alla mano l'Onu dichiara "guerra" alla plastica negli oceani con una nuova campagna di pulizia e sensibilizzazione globale. Obiettivo: eliminare entro il 2022 le principali fonti di inquinamento marino, dalle microplastiche in ambito cosmetico all'eccessivo uso di oggetti di plastica usa e getta (come buste o bottiglie).

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Lavenir: #CleanSeas - comment nous pouvons contribuer au nettoyage des océans

Utiliser une gourde plutôt que des bouteilles en plastique ou éviter les sacs à usage unique: les gestes pour éviter de voir nos océans transformés en poubelles de plastique sont nombreux. Petit tour d’horizon à l’occasion de la campagne #CleanSeas lancée par les Nations Unies, à laquelle adhère la Belgique.

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365 News: Indonesia Pledges $1 B Annually to Clean Up Its Seas

Nusa Dua, Bali. Indonesia has pledged up to $1 billion annually to clean up its seas from plastic debris and other waste over the next eight years.

“At the end of 2025 we will have gotten rid of 70 percent of the plastic waste in our seas,” Coordinating Minister for Maritime Affairs Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan said on Wednesday (23/02).

The average Indonesian uses between 0.8 to 1 kilogram of plastic bags every year, most of which end up on rivers and streams and are washed away to the sea.

The country is the second largest plastic polluter in the world’s oceans — after China — according to a study published in the Science journal in 2015.

Read the full article here

The Huffington Post: There’s A Bold New Plan To Make Ocean Trash A Thing Of The Past

The way things are going now, our oceans will contain more plastic than fish by 2050. An ambitious United Nations campaign aims to stop this from happening.

On Wednesday, UN Environment announced its #CleanSeas initiative at the Economist World Ocean Summit in Bali, Indonesia. The campaign focuses on two major sources of marine litter: single-use plastic bags and microplastics in cosmetic products. The goal is to eliminate these major sources of marine litter by 2022.

Read the full article here

EFE: La ONU lanza una campaña mundial para acabar con los residuos de plástico en los océanos

El Programa de Naciones para el Medio Ambiente (Pnuma) lanzó hoy una campaña mundial para eliminar en 2022 las principales fuentes de basura en los océanos, entre las que predomina el plástico.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

Indo Asian News Service: UN Environment starts campaign to end marine litter

Bali, Feb 23 (IANS) The UN Environment Programme on Thursday launched an unprecedented global campaign to eliminate major sources of marine litter - microplastics in cosmetics and the excessive, wasteful usage of single-use plastic - by 2022.

Launched at the Economist World Ocean Summit in this Indonesian island known for coral reefs, the #CleanSeas campaign is urging governments to pass plastic reduction policies; targeting industry to minimise plastic packaging and redesign products; and calling on consumers to change their throwaway habits -- before irreversible damage is done to our seas.

Read the full article here

The Jakarta Post: Ocean Summit in Bali to discuss future of ‘blue’ economy

With seas around the globe facing unprecedented pressures caused by humans’ reckless endeavors, ranging from exploitative fishing to pollution, prominent international institutions and industry leaders as well as scientists and government representatives are set to convene to discuss the future of a sustainable ocean economy.

Read the full article here

The Independent: India just banned all forms of disposable plastic in its capital

India’s capital city Delhi has introduced a ban on disposable plastic.
 
Cutlery, bags, cups and other forms of single-use plastic were prohibited by the National Green Tribunal (NGT).
 
There is particular concern in the country about the amount of plastic waste it produces. According to the Times of India, it is responsible for an astonishing 60 per cent of the plastic that is dumped in the world’s oceans every year.
 
The ban affects the whole National Capital Territory (NCT) area of Delhi.
 
It was introduced after complaints about the illegal mass burning of plastic and other waste at three local rubbish dumps, which has been blamed for causing air pollution. The sites are supposed to operate as waste-to-energy plants.
 

The Independent: Johnson & Johnson will stop selling plastic cotton buds in half the world to help cut marine pollution

Multinational corporation Johnson & Johnson is to stop selling plastic cotton buds – one of the most common item of litter found on Britain’s beaches – in half the countries of the world after a campaign to cut marine pollution.
 
The company will instead use paper to make the stick of the buds.
 
Dr Clare Cavers of Scottish environmental charity Fidra, which ran a campaign to persuade people to stop using plastic cotton buds, said: “We commend Johnson & Johnson for leading this change in product material, it is an important part of the solution to the growing problem of plastic pollution in our seas.
 
“A step change in consumer behaviour is needed to ensure people dispose of waste responsibly and only flush toilet paper. 
 
“The message cannot be strong enough that only the three Ps (pee, toilet paper and poo) should be flushed, and anything else should go in a bin.”